Immigration Lawyers
in Leeds –
Free Immigration Advice

Whilst we are based in Leeds, many of our clients live in Bradford, Manchester, Wakefield & London.
We provide clients from all over the UK with the following services:

Immigration Law Solutions provided us with an impeccable service exceeding all our expectations. Both Stuart & Jason kept us in the picture with frequent updates. It was a great pleasure having them as our solicitors.

A. Markan. Successful FLR(M) applicant.

Immigration Law Solutions is reputed to be one of the North’s foremost immigration law practices. We are registered with the Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) at the highest level (Level 3), which is the official governing body for immigration advice bodies in the UK.

We understand that there is an abundance of immigration solicitors who do not do their clients justice. We, however, are especially proud of our practice, not only its high client satisfaction rate, but also the high standards of our advice – this is a direct result of our continual mission to remain experts in the latest developments of immigration law. Our immigration lawyers are able to bring extensive knowledge and experience of immigration law to bear on our clients’ problems, founded on our strong belief in ethical conduct. We are committed to providing the best immigration advice and service in Yorkshire and across the UK.

To recieve free immigration advice from one of our immigration lawyers based in the centre of Leeds, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369 or via our online enquiry form.

We understand that our clients are looking for support and guidance, which is why our first step is to talk to our clients – whether face to face, by telephone or Skype. This is to make sure that our clients get to know their immigration lawyer and that their immigration advisor is completely familiar with their case and situation so that they can give the best immigration advice possible. We find this constructive and friendly approach to immigration advice produces a better working relationship and allows us to discuss even the most sensitive matters with tact and discretion.

Our team is led by an esteemed legal practitioner and academic, Stuart Hanson. After selling his training and national awarding company, Stuart has developed over 10 years of immigration experience, has served as a magistrate judge on the magistrate bench for over 5 years and has set up the human rights charity, No Going Back. Never content with learning the minimum required law, Stuart has excelled in learning the Immigration rules inside and out, which has resulted in obtaining Premier League managers, staff and players from Manchester United FC, West Ham FC, Liverpool FC, Cardiff FC and Blackburn Rovers FC.

blackburn rovers fc
West Ham FC

Immigration Advice and Services for You

Our immigration lawyers are expert immigration advisors able to advise on a range of individual immigration needs. From Spouse Visas, Student Visas, and Work Permits to Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR), EEA and Citizenship applications, our immigration advisors are here to help you through the whole immigration process.

If you are settled here, have Indefinite Leave to Remain or are a British national hoping that your family, partner, husband our wife to join you here with a residence permit, our excellent immigration advisors have the experience to provide advice, practical assistance and unparalleled service form beginning to end. We pride ourselves on delivering the best immigration advice individually tailored to each client’s circumstances.

Our immigration lawyers will make it easy for you as we will be with you every step of the way in your visa process, from the very start to the very end. Not only do we provide comprehensive guidance with the documents required for your case, we will tell you of the immigration process and keep you updated on a regular basis.

Immigration Advice and Services for Businesses

In addition to individual immigration law cases, our specialist team of immigration advisors have a wealth of experience in all aspects of business immigration law. We have the expertise to guide clients through the immigration process with the knowledge that we keep abreast of the latest developments in the ever-changing immigration law environment.

We are happy to help any kind of businesses, ranging from small and medium sized businesses to large multi-national companies, with any immigration business related matters, including:

  • Tier 1
  • Tier 2
  • Tier 4
  • Business immigration solutions for entrepreneurs
  • Investors Visas
  • Sole-representatives of an overseas business visas
  • Assistance transitioning from tier 4 visas to graduate or entrepreneur visas
  • Employer duties and compliance obligations
  • Obtaining and maintaining Sponsorship licenses
  • Home Office compliance visits

We understand what you want from Immigration Solicitors & Lawyers

1. Visa Success. 
We are surprised that many immigration solicitors can sleep peacefully at night with the level work that they do. We understand that every single piece of the work that we do has a huge impact on you, your family or your business. This is why we always insist on spending as much time as is needed on your case to ensure that it is absolutely the best application possible. We are not immigration solicitors who treat your case as a number. Rather, we spend a considerable amount of time on legal supporting letters where we clearly outline how your application meets the very strict Immigration Rules. As an immigration firm that is regulated by OISC to the very highest level, you can be assured that we will give you the best possible chance of visa success.

2. Clear, Upfront and Fair Legal Fees
We understand that Immigration solicitors, or solicitors in general, have a rather terrible public reputation when it comes to legal fees! This is why, at Immigration Law Solutions, we always make it absolutely clear in our free immigration advice consultation what the costs will be. In most cases, we will agree on a fixed fee. If it doesn’t take us long to complete your application to the level of the very best application it can possibly be, then that is great for us – if it takes us much longer than expected to complete the application to the highest level, then that is our problem! Additionally, we offer flexible payment plans and can agree on a payment schedule that is most convenient for you.

3. Clear guidance on the visa application process and how long it will take
We also understand that it is important that you are informed of the immigration process that will take place and of any updates that arise. We are not immigration solicitors that leave you in the dark! In our free immigration advice consultation, we inform you of the relevant process and what you should expect.

4. The ability to freely communicate with an Immigration solicitor or lawyer
Do you have any questions about the immigration process or about your case specifically? No problem! At Immigration Law Solutions, we will provide you with the direct number of your own experienced personal immigration advisor who will be dealing with your case.

Stuart & Jason have been such a pleasure to deal with. After attempting the visa twice before only to get refused, it was very clear that the Immigration Law Solution’s visa application pack that was prepared for me was far superior and much more comprehensive. Wishing you guys all the best for the future! 

R Haynes – Surinder Singh Application

We are proud to maintain a 5.0 star rating from our clients on both Google and Facebook!

Stuart Hanson

Head of Practice & Senior Immigration advisor

Melissa Vangeen

Senior Caseworker

Rachel Seabright

Senior Caseworker

Some Of Our Immigration Services

Asylum

  • Asylum and Human Rights Application
  • Home Office interview support
  • Witness statement assistance
  • Home Office cover letters
  • Expert country guidance reports

Permanent residency and nationality

  • Permanent Residency
  • Naturalisation & British citizenship
  • British passport applications
  • Naturalisation British Overseas territory citizens
  • Nationality registration as a British citizen

Visas for Couples

Family members visas

  • EEA – Extended Family Member Visa Applications
  • Extended family member applications
  • Dependant visas

Business visas

  • Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa Application and Review
  • Tier 1 Investor Visa Application and Review
  • Tier 2 Intra Company Transfer Visas and Review
  • Sole Representative of Overseas Business Visa Applications and Review

Staying in the UK visas

  • Indefinite leave to remain
  • Long Residence Applications
  • EEA – Residence Card Applications
  • FLR(M) : Further leave to remain: Marriage
  • FLR(O): Further leave to remain: Other

Visit visas

  • Tourist visit visa
  • Child visit visa
  • Family visit visa
  • Business visit visa

Study & Work Visas 

  • Sponsorship
  • Tier 2 Work Permit Application and Review
  • Tier 4 Student Visa Application and Review
  • Short term study visa

Some Of Our Testimonials

Albania - Further leave to remain (O)

I am so glad I met Stuart and his team after being with the same immigration solicitor for ten years and getting no where I decided to find a new one within a week of meeting Stuart he changed my life. He reunited me with my family and gave me a whole new start and for that I'm grateful. I would recommend him and his team to anyone and I am still dealing with him and still going to be his client always. If I could, I would rate him ten stars but unfortunately I can't - you deserve this five stars and more.

Spain - EEA Residence Card

When I got in contact with Immigration Law Solutions I recoeved the best attention I ever had from immigration advisers. THey were able to provide a fast and nice oslution for my partner. They have been really nice iwth us and 100% professional. I highly recommend them. Best of the best!

Philippines - Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR)

We used Immigration Law Solutions for an ILR application and we were very happy with the service provided from start to finish. They hlped us thoughout the whole process in a friendly and proffesional manner always availabel to answer any questions. I would defintely recommend to anyone.

India - Further leave to remain: Marriage

Immigration Law Solutions provided us with an impeccable service exceeding all our expectations. Both Stuart & Jason kept us in the picture with frequent updates. It was a great pleasure having them as our solicitors.

Russia - Asylum

Everyone at Immigration Law Solutions has been friendly and helpful to my partner and myself. When the trouble started we didn't know where to turn, I thought I was on my own but we found out about Stuart and Immigration Law SOlutions, and I for one thank the Gods that we did. For with them I am sure, that we will overcome this situation and I know that we have much to trust in Stuart and the Immigration Law Solutions team.

Italian - British Citizenship

Stuart has been mega quick in responding to the few questions I had about the process of applying for British Citizenship. He clarified few doubts I had about the importane of certain documents. Very proffesional service!

Portugal - Further leave to remain: Other

Brilliant comprehensive service. I couldn't have asked for better help. Thank you.

South Korea - Fiancé Visa

A first-rate company that offered me all the advice, help and support to quick;ly and easily navigate the minefield that is immigration law. They are a group of lovely people too! 🙂

Brazil - EEA Permanent Residence Card

Would to say thanks for all time bu in special Jennie Chau, from start to finish gave all attention and care about the case. Got my permanent visa with no stress and confidence. Highly recommend and very much appreciated Jennie Chau for excellent service. Defintely I'll return in a year's time to apply for my British Citizenship.

Portugal - British Nationality

Great service and advise. Thank you for your support always. xx

The Standard UK Visa Process

1. Free immigration advice session. 
We welcome people to arrange a free initial consultation with one of our experienced immigration lawyers, who will be able to advise you on the best visa application to make, the general documents required and answer any questions that you may have. At Immigration Law Solutions, we never make the hard sell. Our free initial immigration advice session is free, with no obligation, for you to engage us to represent you or your family.

2. Simple Questionnaire
You will be assigned your own personal immigration lawyer, who will guide you through the whole process from start to finish. The first thing that he or she will do is send you a questionnaire, which allows us to complete the application form, provide you with an easy to follow comprehensive document checklist and write the relevant legal letters according to your own personal circumstances.

3. Document gathering assistance
One of ur immigration lawyers will then assist you with getting these documents. Not sure about what the immigration rules says about the rules regarding payslips or bank statements? No problem! This will be made all very clear to you and one of our immigration lawyers will help you all the way.

4. Finish application pack
Once your personal immigration advisor has made sure that all the documents are in order, he or she will combine these documents with the application form that we completed for you to create an application pack. This application pack will be double-checked by a second senior member of staff.

5. Complete final legal tasks
One of our immigration lawyers will then perform the necessary formalities in order to submit the application. For example, he or she will perform the required tasks on the Visa4uk website and the VFS website, if required. He or she will also pay the Immigration Health Surcharge your behalf, depending on your application.

6. Application pack submission
When this has been done, your personal immigration lawyer will submit off the application for you and handle any communications with the Home Office, when they arise. No stress!

Your Immigration Questions and our Answers

Dear Sir/Madam, I would like to bring my Filipino girlfriend over to the UK to stay and live with me. We have been together for 2 years and our relationship is very strong. Despite including a lot of evidence to show that we are in a real relationship (for example, evidence of financial transfers), our last visitor visa was refused. My question is, would it be easier if we got married? I earn in excess of £70,000 annually.

Thank you for your question. Visitor visas are often very difficult where the person who wants to visit the UK (in this case your girlfriend) does not have strong ties to her home country. The UK Government are scared that she has no intention of returning to her home country. It has been suggested in your query that she lacks economic ties to her country (you provide her with money transfers). This is one element, with others being family, cultural and social ties, that does not look to be in your favour.

If you got married, the potential lack of ties to her home country becomes irrelevant and there are new considerations that the Home Office will take into account. The biggest of this is the financial requirement. If you would like, you can get in touch with one of our immigration advisors on 080 689 1369 to discuss whether this financial requirement, and the other various requirements, are likely to be met.

Can you help me? I am a British national, married for two years to an American; we’ve got three children. His visa ran out two months ago, but he didn't reapply because our son is ill. What should we do? The forum posts and Home Office guidance say different things, that he should either go back to American and reapply, or stay and apply from the UK?

Thank you for your question.

Overstaying can be a major problem for future applications, particularly as the 28 day grace period for fresh applications under section 3c has been abolished. It must be added to the paperwork, especially as non-disclosure can cause severe damage to the good character requirements of the visa application. We would, however, be able to offer more detailed guidance when we have a clearer picture of your personal circumstances.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services. If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I am a Brazilian national, currently in a long-tern relationship with a Spanish national living in the UK. We want to get married in the UK and settle down, what are the steps we need to take for this to happen. Eventually we both want British citizenship, but I am worried that this might be difficult.

Thanks for your question.

Spouses of EEA nationals have a two stage process to undertake if they wish to come to the UK. The first stage is a Family Permit, applied for out of country by the partner; provided that you can prove that you have been in a substantive relationship for more than 2 years this should be a comparatively simple step. Once you have arrived in the UK, you could then apply for a residence card as a family member of an EEA citizen.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services. If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I have put all my documents together, with print outs from my online bank accounts, do these need to be certified or will the print outs be enough? I have heard about a 28 day limit on bank staements, can you explain this?

Thank you for your question.

The 28 day rule means that bank statements must be dated no more than 28 days prior ot the date of submission on the application itself. Even if they are online print-outs of bank statements, you will still need to have them certified by your bank to confirm that they are a genuine copy. Bank statements have to be on official bank stationary and date-stamped on every page to confirm their authenticity.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services. If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I have recently been granted asylum in the UK, having fled my home country. I want my children to be able to join me here, is there any way that this would be possible? Do I have to be earning a minimum amount and have extra space where I’m living? I’m slightly worried that I might not be able to be reunited with them, as I haven’t seen them for years and their father has rejected them.

Thank you for your question.

Overall, it would depend on the type of visa applied for.  If your refugee status is confirmed, then your children might be able to apply for a family reunion visa.  As for accommodation, there would have to be a housing report on where you intend to live, to ensure that it is not overcrowded (as defined in the Housing Acts).  Of course, we will be able to give more precise advice when we have a better picture of your exact circumstances, so please do contact us.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

My partner and I both want to come to the UK. He is a British national but has been working abroad, where we met. I have worked in South Africa for years, and want to apply for jobs in the UK. I’m concerned that his income might not qualify for the adequate maintenance requirement. Can his earnings abroad be used? Does it matter if he has cash savings – we might be able to use these instead?

Thank you for your question.

The average level of cash savings requires that you have at least £62,500 available consistently for a six-month period. This can be a quite onerous threshold to meet, but you should be able to count any income earned abroad toward sthe total requirement. Of course, there are minimum income thresholds which he must meet, normally of £18,600 if he has had to change jobs in the last 6 months, he will have to provide evidence of income for the 12 months prior to the application.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services. If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

ILS, I was hoping for a little advice, I’m the director of my own building company and want to bring my wife over from the Philippines. I have some cash savings, but want to know what documents I need to provide for the application.

Thanks for your question.

This depends on the level of your cash savings.  If you have over £62,500, and have consistently for over 6 months, then this should satisfy the threshold.  All you would need to supply would be evidence of these savings.  On the other hand, you may need to fulfil the appendix fm se requirements for directors of a company, which can be quite complex.  We are, however, more than happy to offer you more detailed advice once we have more information.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Can you give me some advice please? I am a journalist from Nigeria, wanting to come to the UK for a profile piece on the Nigerian communities living across the UK. What type of visa do I need?

Thanks for your question.

 Something along the lines of a temporary work visa may be appropriate, although you will need sponsors in the UK to reassure the Home Office that you will not become a burden on the State and intedn to return to Nigeria at the end of your assignment.  Of course, there may be other requirements which will depend on your precise circumstances, but we would be happy to offer you more detailed advice in due course.

 Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Morning, I hope you can help, I am a British national who has met and started a relationship with an Indian national when we were at University. He’s had to return after his studies, but we are still together. I wonder how much evidence and what type is needed to show our relationship is serious? Are we likely to be interviewed?

Thanks for your question.

Normally, there would need to be evidence that your relationship was substantive for more than two years.  The evidence would usually be photos of you both together as well as transcripts of your conversatons via social media.  If you are interviewed, then it is likely that your relationship, if genuine, will survive any interview that is required.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Can I switch my student visa into a working visa once my course is completed? I have been offered a job and want to be able to stay in the UK to take this up. I am single at the moment, if this helps. Could you also tell me how long it is likely to take to obtain citizenship based on an initial salary of £22,000?

Thanks for your question. 

Transfer is possible; however, you must make sure that your employer is on the sponsor’s list, this is regularly updated and you can easily google this.  Also, you will then need to check the Standard Occupational Classification codes list.  Once you have checked this, it is advisable to see where your job fits within the framework.  As you will note, the recurrent requirement insists that all jobs for foreign nationals that require a Tier 2 license need to be at NQF level 6.  This does not mean that you have to have qualifications at this level, which is often a misnomer, but the job has to be working at a level that it requires skills at NVQ level 6.  In addition to this, the company will need to carry out the resident labour market test if you job is not listed on the shortage occupation list.  This list is regularly updated by the government according to the perceived needs of companies in the UK.

Hi, my partner arrived on 18th December last year from Canada on a Tier 5 temporary work visa. I am a British citizen and receive the standard rate PIP, but since he moved in, the severe disability element of my housing benefit and the reduction I council tax nave been cut. Would he be able to claim carers allowance while living with me, or would this be a breach of his visa for public funds claims?

Thanks for your question.

Claiming Carers Allowance would utmost definitely be a breach of the visa terms.  Carers Allowance is classed as a public funded payment, which means that he wouldn’t be able to claim on his present visa.  Moreover, you cannot claim it on his behalf, as it has tp be paid directly to the carer themselves.  As his residence continues, he may reach the ILR stage, at which point he may be able to claim public funds.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I married a British national in May 2012, and have almost completed my first visa extension in 2017, what do I need to do next to obtain Indefinite Leave to Remain?

Thanks for your question.

This is a comparatively simple process, as once you have completed five years residence in the UK, you can apply for ILR.  You may have to take an English language test (depending on your home nation) and also take a life in the UK test as well.  There are a couple of other threshold test which you must meet, and we can offer more detailed advbice once we know more about your circumstances.

 Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

My nephew’s wife is from Ghana; he is a UK citizen and they were married in Ghana in July last year. She will be applying for a spouse visa. What would happen in the meantime if she applied for a visitor visa to come to the UK before the spouse visa was granted?

Thanks for your question.

It could be argued that the visitor visa would be unsuccessful as, with a spouse visa pending, she would have no reason to return to Ghana – and thus be a severe risk in terms of overstaying.  It should also be borne in mind that it is not possible to switch from a visitor to a spouse visa whilst in the UK.  On the whole it could be entirely self defeating as she may be required to return to Ghana in order to make a spouse visa application.

 Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Hi there, I am a Chinese citizen with ILR for the UK, and I am wondering whether you have ever heard of ILR being revoked due to travel. If no crime is committed, can travel to somewhere like Iran, for tourist purposes cause it to be revoked. I ask because I am planning a photographic tour, and while it isn’t as sensitive as somewhere like Syria or Afghanistan – bar the political tension. I have heard of one case where a British Iranian had his citizenship revoked as he travelled to Iran. I think his family were political refugees though. Also, have you ever heard of an application being deliberately delayed because they have certain countries’ stamps in their passport.

Thanks for your question.

 This isn’t something that we have heard of before in our practice.  On the other hand there may be a change in government policy regarding the rules surrounding what constitutes a danger to the public or a serious public policy reason for depriving someone of citizenship.  I don’t believe that thisis likely to happen in the case of tourism.  We haven’t come across a deliberate delay in any application either.  We have found that the Home Office can tend to take longer to process applications when there is a high level of demand for visas, but this tends to be cyclical and not something to worry about. 

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I was born in Canada to a British father and Canadian mother, is there any way I can become a British citizen without spending time in the UK?

Thanks for your question.

That would depend on when you were born. If you were born prior to the 1st July 2006, you might be able to apply for citizenship by descent via your father, who was a British national.  Of course, we would need further details to provide more accurate information.

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Can I claim permanent residence certificate? I came to UK from Latvia, worked and was on the Worker registration scheme of the A8 countries full time from 2005-20010, then part time after three month break. I have two children 13 and 7 so I claim public funds, Working and child tax credit, housing benefit and council tax benefit, Will my application be turned down because of this?

Thanks for your question.

I think that your consistent working for over ten years would tend to suggest that you have been exercising your Treaty rights for the whole period, and for at least 5 years.  Once this 5 year period has been fulfilled, then you have rights of Permanent Residence – the card merely proves this.  You don’t have to apply for these rights, they are automatically gained.  You application won’t be affected by claiming funds to which you are legally entitled.

 Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

I am a British man, living with my girlfriend, whose student visa expired last year, we didn’t have the money process his paperwork as I was very ill. What sort of chance do we have, does the fact that she’s pregnant make any difference?

Thanks for your question.

It would depend on what visa she would be applying for, for an unmarried partner, there are a few thresholds you must meet:

-       An income of £18,600 (earned by the UK sponsoring partner)

-       Evidence to prove that you have a durable relationship and have been living together as if married for the past two years.

-       Any accommodation is suitable for you both to live in, i.e that it is not overcrowded.

 

Please note that our answers are general advice only, and cannot be taken as legal advice until we have a full instruction from you and engagement of our services.  If you would like to engage us, please feel free to contact us on 0800 689 1369.

Hi. I am just wondering if you can help me with a rather simple question. I am not sure if you can assist me, as it may be quite complicated. I was born in India and I have an Indian passport. After staying in India up until when I was 18 years old, I went to the UK for the purposes of studying Computer Science. The university that gladly accepted me was Leeds University. However, the immigration department at the university could not really help me as they said that they only deal with student visas. It is for this reason why I have decided to contact you, as I am not sure about the immigration route that is best for me. I want to settle in the UK and I have just married an English woman. Together, we earn about £52,000 as we both work full-time. My student visa runs out in 29 days. What is the visa application called that I consider applying for?

FLR (M)

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration Law Solutions. My name is Charlie and I am wanting my partner to join me in the UK. I work in the army and I deal with the technology side to developing weapons. My annual earnings are over £25,000. Oh, and I am also British. I met my partner two years ago and I have applied twice for a visa for her to come over. However, both times my UK visa was refused. The first time was because I think I applied for the wrong visa. The visa was called a visitor visa and in the refusal letter, it mentioned that the visa type was wrong and they could therefore not consider my application. The second time I applied for a wife visa, but it was refused because I did not include ‘bank statements that have been issued by the bank’. The Home Office could therefore not be persuaded that they were real. Is it correct that they refused me on this grounds? Charlie

Hi Charlie, thank you for your message. Unfortunately, the Home Office are very strict when it comes to bank statements. The rules can be found in Appendix FM-SE, and you will see here that the Home Office require bank statements that are either printed on official bank stationary, or ones that are certified by the bank (i.e. stamped on every page).

If you would to book your free consultation, please get in touch with us and we will be happy to help.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi Immigration Solicitors. My friend Ramos told me to contact you guys as you have helped him with his wife’s EEA residence application. They speak very highly of you! My question is that I have been refused a visitor visa for my Philippines girlfriend. I am British. I have known my girlfriend for 4 years now and I really want her to come and stay in the UK with me. We are really close and we are able to evidence that we really love each other, I mean, we text each other every day and my phone bills are always really high. You can see on the phone bills that we speak a lot! In any case, I would like to try again. We are wanting to get married as soon as possible and I have already set a date. We are going to marry in 2 weeks. I, however, would like to apply for a visitor visa again but I am wondering what effect this will have on a future spouse application.

Thank you for your message. You will have to carefully consider applying again. We do not know sufficient details to comment on why your application was refused but it is often the case that Filipinos are refused visitor visa due to a lack of solid ties to their home country. We suggest getting in touch, as refused UK visa applications has a negative affect on subsequent applications.
Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi, I am looking for an immigration lawyer to assist my client with a renewal of a spouse visa. I am an accountant working in Leeds and often get asked for help such visas. Unfortunately, I am not an immigration lawyer or immigration solicitor! If you would like to get in touch, I have sent you an email just now. In any event, the following are the details. My client owns a company. He is a sole director of a limited company. The company is very small and he is the only employee. He pays himself a salary of £14,000 a year and he receives £9,000 a year in dividends. I issue these dividends so I am clear that they have been issued in accordance with all of the accountancy rules. I have two questions. Firstly, can the salary and dividends be combined to meet the financial requirement? Secondly, what is the financial requirement as he has no children?

Thank you for your message. The answer to your questions are as follows:

1)   Yes, employment income and dividends can be combined in that situation to meet the financial requirement

2)   The financial requirement would be £18,600

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Sir/madam, I am a British national and I would like to bring my wife to the UK. I am employed as a taxi driver. I understand that I need to earn £18.600 a year in order to renew my wife’s spouse visa. However, I only earn about £11,000 a year as a taxi driver. I am realy sad having just found out that I do neet the finaical requirement. Or am I correct? Is there anything that you can do to assist me? In order to help you help me, I will proide as much finformation as I possibly can. I have lived in Leeds for the whole of my life. My mother is Pakistani national but my father is British. I am not sure why my mother is not yet British but I suppose I am not too concerned as she is happy. I was in an workplace related accident about 3 years ago and since that time I have been receiving disability living allowance. I own a property in the UK and I have titled deeds to prove this. I also have £39,000 in cash savings but I understand that you need over £62,500 in order to satisfy the financial requirement through that. Is there anything I can do?

Hi. Thank you for contacting us. Based on the information provided, it seems likely that you meet the financial requirement.  As you are in receipt of disability living allowance, the relevant financial level that would need to be met will not be £18,600, but rather the adequate maintenance levels. The Home Office providing some guidance on this but we would suggest contacting a qualified immigration lawyer in order to assist you with the adequate maintenance test.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear immigration lawyers, are you based in Leeds? I am an Angolan national and I previously claimed for asylum 7 years ago. However, I was refused and I also lost the immigration refusal letter so I cannot say for sure why I was refused asylum. However, whilst I was refused asylum, I have been in a relationship with a Portuguese national for a very long time. In fact, I have known her since I was 16 and I am now 37. We have been I a relationship for a very long time. I have lived with her for many years and I have proposed to her not so long ago. However, as I have not got a lot of money, I have not married her as the ring is too expensive. It can be said with certainty, however, that we are in a serious relationship. Four years ago, I engaged a local solicitor to process a EEA family permit. I wasn’t happy with their communication however. I am still in a relationship with the Portuguese national. Can I apply for another residence visa in the UK? Thank you for your enquiry. Yes, we are based in Leeds but have clients from all over the UK. Regarding your other question, on the face of it, it does appear that you will be eligible for another EEA family permit. The relevant application form here will be an EEA (EFM) whilst you remain unmarried, and EEA (FM) if you are married at the time of application. Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766. I look forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Immigration Law Solutions

Thank you for your enquiry. Yes, we are based in Leeds but have clients from all over the UK. Regarding your other question, on the face of it, it does appear that you will be eligible for another EEA family permit. The relevant application form here will be an EEA (EFM) whilst you remain unmarried, and EEA (FM) if you are married at the time of application.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I would like the following enquiry asked quickly. I am in the process of applying for my fiancé’s immigration settlement application. I am a sole director of a limited company. I have all of the documents in place. At least I think I do. I have the following documents. Marriage certificate, my divorce certificate for my previous relationship, my British passport, my partner’s Thai passport, employer payslips for the past financial year, my dividend payslips for the past financial year, CT600 form and a few others. It has been such an effort getting these documents! However, in my company, my last years accounts ends in 2015. In tax law, this is fine as I do not need to submit my accounts until later in the year. The reason for this is my accountant is really slow. However, is this years fine? I am not too clear on what the ‘last full financial year’ means in relation to the Immigration Rules.

Thank you for your message. You will need to contact your accountant to ask them to do the latest years accounts. The ‘last full financial year’, at the time of this message, is that ending in 2016. If you submit the documents you have, your fiancé will not be granted her visa as the financial requirements will not have been met.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I hope you can help me and my family as we are not really sure what the situation is for the Immigration Rules. I work in Leeds as a griller at Bem Brazil. I have been employed for over two years and I work full time, usually over 35 hours a week. I am a duel citizenship holder of Brazil and Portugal. My children are currently live in Brazil. They do not have much money at all due to the poor economy of the rural area that they live in and I send back a lot of my savings to them every month or so. They are 19 and 20. My wife is Brazilian and she is looking after the children. She would also like to come, but only if our children can come with us. Is there anything that I can do?

Thank you for your message. As you are deemed to be a ‘qualified person’, you will be able bring your wife over, no problem. If your children are dependant on you, as you say that they are, then you can also bring them over to stay in the UK with you.  However, bringing your children over is deemed to be a lot more complex as you would need to evidence their financial dependency. The immigration route would be an ‘EEA Family permit’ here. Please get in touch if you would like further assistance with this.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration Law Solutions. I am contacting you as I would like to enquire about he possibility of using my cash savings to bring over my wife, who is a Pakistani national. I am fairly familiar with the majority of the relevant immigration rules but I just want to make it very clear with the cash savings rule. The immigration fees are too high for me to get refused! Kind regards, Azhar.

Hi Azhar. You are correct in thinking that the cash savings can be used to satisfy the financial requirement. If you do not have any children, the required cash savings that will be required to solely satisfy the financial requirement will be £62,500.  If you have children, the required amount may be higher, depending on the nationality of your children. Please also note, however, that there are several rules attached to relying on the cash savings requirement.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I would like to claim asylum because I am a gay man from Bangladesh. I have heard your firms name from my friend who was granted asylum due to the fact that he was gay and that he was from a country which persecuted Pakistanis. However, I want to ask, because I have not met many men in the UK, will this prevent me from claiming asylum because I am a gay man? I really do not go back as I fear that I will face death. My family will also likely hurt me.

I would like to claim asylum because I am a gay man from Bangladesh. I have heard your firms name from my friend who was granted asylum due to the fact that he was gay and that he was from a country which persecuted Pakistanis. However, I want to ask, because I have not met many men in the UK, will this prevent me from claiming asylum because I am a gay man? I really do not go back as I fear that I will face death. My family will also likely hurt me.

Thank you for your mail. Sex is not the same as sexuality. At Immigration Law Solutions, we specialise in assisting gay men claim asylum once they are in the UK. Please contact us so we can discuss this complex area further.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi Immigration Lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions. I contacted you as my local firm, Boys & Maughan in Margate forwarded me your contact details. I live in Margate and I have lived in Margate for over 12 years. I was granted refugee status many years ago, I have always been employed and I earn a lot of money a year as I own a local restaurant. Am I eligible to become British? Hassan.

Hi Hassan. From the facts provided, it appears that you can possibly apply for British nationality. With this being said, we cannot comment for sure, as there would be other factors that would need to be taken into consideration. If you would like to arrange a free consultation with one of our senior immigration lawyers, please get in touch.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Good afternoon Jason. My name is Peter and I spoke with you at the Polish church, where you and Stuart presented the presentation about protecting our rights and stay in the UK following Brexit. I have a question. I have been employed at Morrisons in the UK for the last 6years and I have worked my way up the employment ladder to become senior manager. I had a break from work following an injury and I signed on jobseekers between year 3 and year 4 of my job at Morrisons. I have never had trouble with the police or the UK courts and I have not left the UK for too long. I am pretty sure that I satisfy the requirements to apply for permanent residency. I would like to confirm that I am eligible. I will get in touch with you soon.

Hi Peter. You may wish to speak with one of our qualified immigration advisors, as there may be a few issues regarding claiming permanent residency. In particular there are rules surrounding the length of time one can claim jobseekers, as well as rules surrounding the length of time one can leave the UK.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Sirs, I am contacting you to ask you about the requirements for extending my husband’s stay in the UK. We previously spent a lot of time on the previous visa but I think we need help this time. The following is our information that you might need. I do not work, but my husband does. He is a engineer, but has been on and off of work over the past year, following the death of my sister in law. I know that in my previous further leave application, as we had no financial difficulties at all and earned over £60,000 annually, there were no issues with the application. However, in the past year, my husband has stopped working and has only earned a few thousand pounds in the past year. We have one child who has already started school in the UK and has lived in the UK since birth. Another worrying thing is that I am pregnant and I am expecting a child on the 4th of next month. What application would be the most appropriate to do? Sandy

Hi Sandy,

Whilst we would need further information to comment on the suitability of certain applications, we would suggesting looking into a FLR(FP) application. This is an application where the financial requirement would need not be met.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I really need help with my question. I married someone who is English in 2011. In the past, I have already finished my first extension of visa and my current visa will finish in August 2017. I would like to stay in the UK for as long as possible. I have a good job here and family and friend. What are the next steps for me?

Thank you for your question. As it appears you have completed five years’ residency in the United Kingdom, you may consider making an application for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR). For this application, it may be required of you to pass an English language test and a Life in the UK test, in addition to satisfying other requirements.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration lawyers, My boyfriend is a Brazilian national and we have been in a relationship for many years. He joined me in the UK from Spain (which is where I am from) and would like to extend his stay. He was given a 6 month visa here but would like to extend his permission to stay. I know that because I am Spanish, a European, I have good rights to allow this to happen. However, in order to apply for a residence document, will I need to marry my boyfriend in order for him to stay here with me? I have always worked, both in Spain but also in the UK. I have been in the UK for 2 years. Rachel

Hi Rachel,

You will not need to marry your partner in order for your partner to stay in the UK with you. He can do so providing you remain a ‘qualified person’. You are a qualified person as you are working. The correct application form that you are seeking is an EEA (EFM) application form, which is for extended family members.  He will be given a 5-year visa.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Please to make your acquaintance. I have been self-employed for about 7 months now, and I earn over £18,600. In fact, my annual income is expected to be about £22k. Do I need to show 6 months bank statements in order to bring my wife from Iraq to the UK? Or do I need to show that, in the last 12 months I have earned over £18,600? The law does not seem to be very clear of this. On the one hand, my friends are telling me that I need to show payslips (when I am self-employed??) and other friends are telling me that payslips are not needed, as I am self-employed. I have an accountant who will be able to produce the documents I ask for and he is very willing to help.

Thank you for contacting us. It is great that you have an accountant, as those who are self-employed are expected to produce numerous documents to evidence the fact that the financial requirement is met. As a self-employed person, you do not need to show payslips. Rather, you must show that in the last full financial year, that you earned more than £18,600. For you, as you have said that you have only been self-employed for about 7 months, meeting the financial requirement for a standard husband or wife visa seems unlikely be difficult if you do not have other sources of income. It is advised to contact an experienced immigration lawyer to help you with your application.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi Jason Once Again thank you so much for coming back to me through Facebook. Here is a short story of my battling with applying for Citizenship and once being refused. I have moved from Poland to UK on 21.06.2003 only for holidays were staying with friend of mine haven't been working. Summer ends and I went back to Poland only for few weeks to return to UK in mid September. I've started working for recruitment agency beginning of October and on 25th October 2003 I was granted with WRS certificate. In august 2004 I was offered a permanent position in the company was working for through recruitment agency, so I did accept it. I was employed there until end of July 2015, where i have changed the place of work to my current employment. In 2015 we welcomed our daughter who holds dual nationality. In 2015 myself and my partner got married. In October 2015 I applied for naturalization and that is where things took unexpected turn for me. Beginning of march 2016 I have received the letter from Home Office with refusal of my citizenship. The letter stated the reason of: "As you have not been granted in-definitive leave to remain in the United Kingdom or established Permanent Residence, under Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2006, you do not meet the requirement at paragraph 3(d) of the leaflet. The application is therefore refused. If you wish to become a British Citizen, you will need to make a fresh application. It is open to you to apply at any time." We believe to be refused on the WRS not re-registering after changing employments after first 10 months (at time I wasn't aware I need to register again if I change the employer in my first 12 months). Learnt hard way I did not exercise the treaty right. Also my application was looked under section 6(1) where I expected it to be looked under 6(2) as married to British CItizen. As the Brexit referendum was approaching fast and outcome was fairly worrying for most EU citizens in May last year I have applied for Permanent Residency which I was granted on 20th October 2016. Type of document: Document Certifying Permanent Residence. I have thought now I have to wait 12 months before I can apply again for Naturalization which is quite worrying again as by end of March there is a plan of starting Article 50 of Lisbon treaty. I did came across the note that if I am married to a British Citizen I can apply straight away after receiving my Permanent Residency. Now we coming to lots of questions in regards of that: 1. How can I clearly state in the application that I am actually applying under 3 years period on Marriage fundamental. Do I have to be married for certain period of time or basically I can do it straight away (well been married for 1,5 years now). In AN booklet says in 3 or 5 years qualifying period to be resident in the UK for at least 5 years even if married to British Citizen. 2. On next page is the Breach of Immigration paragraph does WRS fall down into that too? well not re-registering after changing employer. As it says: "Just because you were given in-definitive leave to remain does not mean that we will automatically disregard the time you were in breach of immigration laws during the residential qualifying period(...) this includes immigration breaches in the 10 year period before you can apply for naturalisation." Is that related to WRS (EEA) or just to good character. 3. If biometric been taken with previous application but because it was refused I did not received the card do I have to repeat my Biometric or can I let the Home Office know in explanations box that I already have my finger prints taken. 4. Does Life in the UK test / certificate have any expired date or can I use the one I have completed in October 2015? 5. I was going through chapter 18 Annex B and came across 2 points that I do not understand and wondering how they can affect my future application and how. Number one, the start of qualifying period starts day after Home Office receive the application. Number two, Where an applicant misses the registration to be in the UK on the date prior to the application date by 2 months or less either way. What do these mean? 6. If you think I am clear to make fresh application (don't really want to be refused again and can't really afford it)How would it affect it if we have couple of leaving the country already booked. One April/may and second June/July time. 7. if it would be better to wait after the holidays do you know if there are any changes into applying process coming with triggering article 50 of Lisbon treaty? how "safe" i can feel with holding just residency card and how difficult applying for naturalisation might become during the leaving period? thank you for your time

Thank you for your email, which has been passed to me for attention.

Based on the limited information that you have provided, we would be able to answer some of the questions that you raised. However, in order to fully address all of the questions that you have, we would need further information from you.  

We would also advise that in light of your earlier refusal and the complexities of your circumstances, a letter should be submitted with any application to outline how you meet the relevant rules and addressing any of the previous points that you were refused on. Otherwise you may risk a new application being refused and your money being lost.

The last time I checked, I recall that leaving the UK while an application for nationality was pending does not mean that the application will be refused. Therefore you could submit the application before your holidays. However, I would need to check this again in case the guidance has changed.

If you wish for us to review your case in further detail, there would be a fee for this. I would estimate that it would take one hour to obtain the necessary information from you and to produce a detailed letter of advice. Our fee for I hour is £125.

If you then wished to instruct us to assist with the nationality application, we would work with you to decide what the fee would be based on the amount of work we would be required to do. The fee would be lower if we were just completing a legal letter for you, but higher if we did the whole application including completing application forms. If you did instruct us to do the application, the fee for the initial 1 hour advice would be deducted.

Please advise me of how you would like to proceed and we can make the necessary arrangements.

Kind regards, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Hello. My partner is from Latvia and works a lot. In fact she works over 60+ hours a week since August 2015. I am American and have an American passport. We recently relocated ot the UK from Spain where we stayed for 6 years. It is really difficult for me to explain that I am allowed to work in the UK to prospective employers – as they ask for a visa or residence card, which I do not have. However, I have been told that Directive 2004/38/EC, the European Parliament, that because she is exercising her treaty rights, these rights to reside and work also apply to me as her husband. However, my prospective employers are not satisfied and insist on some documentation. Whilst I have applied for a residence card I have been told that this will take many many months, especially after Brexit and I need to work ASAP. Could you please let me know what I can do?

Thank you for your question. If you applied for a EU Family Permit when you entered the UK, you will be able to use this as proof of your right to reside and work in the UK. Do you have this document?

Hi. I have started to become very worried because of Brexit – my life is in the UK and I am scared that that may be forced to end. I am 47 years old and I am German. I have been married to a British wife and I have lived in the UK for over 11 years. I have been employed for the majority of that time. So you can see that I contributed to the UK and paid taxes for a large part of my recent life and I recently received a statement of what pension I am entitled to based on my national insurance contributions. Our daughet has both British and German nationality and really loves the UK. Would you advise that I apply for permanent residency and then following that, dual nationality just like my daughter? I run a charity and have been for 4 years and do a lot of voluntary work. It saddens me deeply and I am scary everyday and so I very much appreciate your advice. Andrea Winston.

Dear Andrea,  

Thank you for your question. We can understand why you are feeling distressed, but it is our view at Immigration Law Solutions that people in your position can relax. If you have been exercising your European Union Treaty Rights in the UK by working, then you could apply for a permanent residence card. As you state that you’ve been in the UK for a long time, you may also consider applying for British citizenship. In order to do this, however, you will need a permanent residency card.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi. Not so long ago I applied for an increase in tier 2 visa for me and my family – my family were dependants of the visa. My application was rejected because they said that the skilled level 6 was required. I applied for administrative review but that was also refused. My first tier 2 visa application on a skilled level was refused in October of 2011 but I then appealed the deicison. The decision was allowed for several reasons by the court. However the Home Office did not appeal the case but I think it important to tell you that the Presenting Officer in the first case confirmed to the court that he withdrew. But I am very frustrated to think that I was refused again. Can I win case if I judicial reviewed my case?

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us earlier this morning. My name is Jason and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

Hello, I am from Nigeria and I am a student. I would like to apply for a tier 4 visa. When I apply, I would like to use my uncle’s bank statements, as he has been finaicially supporting me. This is because my parents no longer work. In the guidelines, I want to ask what ‘court document’ means, as some of my classmates were refused even when they submit an affidavit. I would very much like your help.

Thank you for your question. A court document may be referring to an official document that has been issued by the court saying that your uncle is your legal guardian. In accordance with policy guidelines, the supporting documents that you include must  be either an original document or a copy that has been signed by a Notary.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Thank you for your question. A court document may be referring to an official document that has been issued by the court saying that your uncle is your legal guardian. In accordance with policy guidelines, the supporting documents that you include must be either an original document or a copy that has been signed by a Notary. Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766. I look forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Immigration Law Solutions Greetings. I would like to clarify my immigration status in the UK. I am a Czech national and I came to study in at Leeds university in 2006. I graduated in 2010 and following that, I got a job at a big accountancy firm. I have been working here since that. Two months ago, I married another Czech national and we are wondering, after the Brexit referendum, to evidence our right to stay in the UK, should we be apply for a permanent residence card or a permanent residence certificate? What document would be better if we decide that we want to get British citizenship?

Thank you for your email. In light of Brexit, it may be a good idea for both you and your wife to get obtain a permanent residence card, as these are required to apply for British citizenship. You will both be eligble to apply, as it seems that you have been both been exercising your EU treaty rights for over five years.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Good morning, I am from Nigeria to a British father and a Ghanian mother. I am 26 years old and I am wondering if it is possible for me to acquire British citizenship. I would be very grateful if you could answer.

Thank you for your question. It may be possible that you could apply for British citizenship by descent through your British-born father, as you were born before 1st July 2006.

 

 Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hello, I’m called Hassan and I have been told about your services by my friend who said that you dealt with her case in a really good manner. My leave to remain in the UK was due to expire on 28 September 2007. I then applied for a new UK visa on 23rd May 2007. However, I was not given the visa as my credit card rejected the Home Office payment. Unfortunately, I did not get a letter explaining why I was refused. My application was sent on the same day service in May 2007. I got my visa on 2nd July 2008. However, I am now eligble for a 10 year long residency route, I think. I really need some assistance with this because the immigration route is very complex to me and I need help. Yours sincerely, Hassan Ahmed.

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us earlier last night. My name is Jason and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

 

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

Perhaps I should have contacted an immigration solicitor before I made my application because I was refused the application to become British because in the past I have worked illegally and I was caught. Can you provide me with free advice please. Thank you very much I appreciate it.

Thank you for your question. British citizenship can be a complex area of law and we would need to know more about your personal circumstances in order to advise accordingly. What we can say at this point, however, is that one of the requirements for becoming British is ‘being of good character’. Therefore, in order to give you the best advice, we will need to consult with you about your personal circumstances and devise a strategy to see if a successful future application can be made. 

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I am a non-EEA national and I am the holder of a tier 2 visa. Me and my brother own a property in Leeds. My brother is an investor who lives and works in Iran. Me and my brother are of Pakistani origin. Is there a way that my brother could join me in the UK? I would like to know about the different immigration routes open to him. He has never even seen the UK before.

Thank you for your enquiry. Your brother may want to consider applying for a Tier 2 visa. A requirement is that he must receive a job offer from an employer in the UK who holds a sponsorship license.

 

Another possible route to consider is a Tier 4 (Student) visa, provided she has been offered a place on a course with a recognized institution.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration lawyers, My name is Pawel from Budapest. I have stayed legally in UK for 5 years but last year I had to stop working as I was expecting a child. Is it an issue that I had not been in employment for longer than 5 or 6 months? During this time I received numerous benefits. It may also be noted that I have about £83,000 in my bank account for the last five years. I do not want to state the source of this, unless I really have to. Can I get British citizenship or what is the best way forward for me?

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us just moments ago. My name is Jason and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

 

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

Hi Immigration Law Solutions. I have a question that would be really great if you could answer. I was born in Leeds, in the UK in 1984. I stayed with my mother and father in Margate until 1992 when I was about 8 years old. Unfortunately, my father made me return to Ghana. We really hated going back as kids but I suppose there were no other alternative. I would like to return to the UK as I see it as my home and I think that the economic situation is a lot better there. Is there anything you can do to help?

Thank you for your enquiry. It is possible that you may be considered to be British. This is because of your birth in the UK and the fact that you lived in the country up until the age of 8. You may seek to obtain your UK bith certificate and make an out of country application for a British passport through the British High Commission.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration lawyers. I am an over stayer on a UK visa. I have been here for the majority of my life, as I have been here for 16 years. I arrived in the UK on a visit visa when I was 10 or so. I have never been to Europe or anywhere else in the world since arriving in the UK. I have been in school here, both high school and sixth form. I have not had any trouble with the law and I do not have any ties to my birth country, which is Malaysia. I have read about how staying 10 years or 20 years residence would help my case but I am not sure about the criteria. Do I have the chance to apply for Indefinite Leave to remain?

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us earlier this morning. My name is Stuart and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

 

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so. 

I am looking for free immigration advice. I have been a resident of the UK with my wife and three children. I have two sons, aged 19 and 14, and one daughter, who is 14. I regret to say that when we arrived here, we did not inform the UK government. We did not inform them shortly after either. With this said, we have a NI number since 2002. We are now successful entrepreneurs and have our own company and we have been contributing to the UK by paying the compulsory taxes since 2005. We would like to apply for Permanent residence, but there is an issue. Since my grandmother is actually very ill, we need to go and see her but this would mean that we cannot apply for permanent residency based on our EU rights. If we apply in January or February, will this cause any issues for our residence in the UK?? We do not know what to do with our family life being here in the UK. I would appreciate your free immigration advice.

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us recently. My name is Stuart and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

I need help from an immigration lawyer. I am from Iran. My husband and I do not like life in Iran and we would not want to raise our daughter here in Iran. We would very much like to know if it is possible to obtain residency in the UK. Please feel free to contact us at any time in order to ask for more information if it is needed. We are ready to engage a lawyer to help us, providing the fees are reasonable. All we want is a good future for our 5 year old daughter. I am also pregnant and I am expecting another child in 3 months. What we want is residency and a work permit so that we can work. We have cash savings of about £70,000. Please help us if you can, or let us know if you cannot. Many thanks in advance. Asad.

Dear Mr Asad,

 

Thank you for your question. There could be a number of options available to you. If you would like to come to the UK for work, you will need to obtain a Tier 2 (General) visa or a Tier 2 (Intra-company Transfer) Visa from an employer who holds a UK sponsor license- providing your current employer has an office in the UK.

Alternatively, you could enquire into coming to the UK on a Tier 4 (Student) visa, however, it should be noted that it is becoming increasingly difficult for overseas students to remain in the UK when their course finishes.

I would like to get a family permit for me after I marry my Spanish partner. I am a Ghanian national and my Spanish partner is working in the UK. Would this be difficult because of Brexit? My Spanish partner’s income is higher than £18,600. It may also be noted that I have a PhD from a UK university, Leeds university.

Thank you for your question. We are happy to assist you in making your application. As you are a family member of an EU national wishing to come to the UK, you will need to go through a two stage process. You will first have to apply for a EU Family Permit from outside the UK. Following this you can make an application for an EEA Residence permit, which will generally be issued for five years and will evidence the applicant’s right to work and travel in the UK.

 

There are condition that must be met in order to apply for an EEA Family Permit as a spouse:

-Your EU partner must be exercising their Treaty rights in the UK. They will be exercising their treat rights if they are employed, self-employed in study or are a self-sufficient national).

-You and your partner must have met each other

-You and your partner must intend to live together

We would be happy to provide you with full assistance with making your application

 Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration Law Solutions, my name is George and I am English. I was born in the UK in 1989, although I have been living in Pakistan since 2006. My father, who has sadly passed away in 1999, was born outside the UK but shortly moved there and became English. He has an English passport. My mother is Spanish, but has been staying in Leeds since 1971. Whilst they were not married when I was born, they married less than 6 months after my birth. I do have a birth certificate for myself, my father and my mother. My dad told me that my mum made sure that I had the birth certificates for all of us. Am I Britisih ‘other than by descent’ or =under the category ‘by descent’? Also, am I able to pass my British citizenship to my kids?

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us earlier this morning. My name is Jason and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

 

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

I would like free immigration advise please sirs. I first came to England on a tier student visa and a few years later, I applied for a FLR application, but it got refused. I appealed because I thought the decision was wrong and I have a bad health condition. But now I need to get a visitor visa to attend a family friend’s event and he owns a company that has invited me. I can provide you with the information on y previous immigration history if it is possible to get a visit visa in my circumstances? If so, please let me know if possible so I can start the visa application with you straight away as the event is only in 7 weeks and there needs to be time for Home office to process my visa application. It would be great if you could respond really quickly.

Thank you for your message and for your email, which was sent to us earlier this afternoon. My name is Jason and I am one of the immigration lawyers at Immigration Law Solutions.

 

This is just a courtesy email to let you know that we have responded to your email and can confirm that we are available to see you later on this week. In light of this, if you would like to contact us to confirm an appointment, please feel free to do so.

Hello. I arrived in the UK in April 2007. I applied for one FLR (FP) extension in 2013. However, the application was refused and the appeal date was set for 2nd August 2028. My last permission to stay was tier 4 student – but the college just recently run down so I am on section 3c leave right now. I ask, am I allowed to be apply for an in-country application to be dependent of a tier 4 student before my appeal? My partner is studying in Leeds university at degree level. I don’t really know my position as the advice given by different immigration lawyers is contrary. Please can you advise me.

Thank you for your question. This area of immigration law is complex and we would need further information from you before we can provide you with assistance.

I have a question which I hope you can answer. I am Uganda and I came to the UK in 1972 as a little child on my mother’s British passport. I lived in the UK since 1st January 2016 when I returned to Uganda to bury my mother, only to be told that I cannot return. How can I return? I am stuck in Ghana and don’t know where to go or do. My children, family, job and life is in the UK. What can I do ???

Thank you for contacting us.

 

We are sorry to hear about your situation. We would like to help you but we will need further information form you in order to do so. What passport do you have? An out of country application could be made, depending on what passport you have. One of my colleagues will be in touch in the near future.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Hi, I’m a 41 year old British woman with an annual income of £37,000. I am currently 4 months pregnant with my first child. The issue is that my Ugandan boyfriend’s student visa has expired. Unfortunately, we didn’t have any money to pay for the Home Office fees as a result of a workplace injury of mine. I ask, is there the chance of the application being rejected or would a positive outcome be more likely with me being pregnant? A quick answer back would be very much appreciated.

Thank you for your inquiry.

 

In order to help, we will need to know the type of visa your boyfriend is planning on applying for. If you are considering an unmarried partner visa, there are certain financial requirements that you would normally need to meet, including:

-A minimum of £18,600 from yourself. This amount will increase if you have children.

-  Supporting evidence to show that you have been living together in a relationship akin to marriage for the past two years

- Supporting evidence to show that you have suitable accommodation for the both of you to live in.

 

In addition to the above, there are other requirements that must be met. You will be contacted by 1pm today to discuss how we may be able assist you.

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

I am wondering if you can help me. I came to the UK with a general 6 months visit visa. My visa has now expired and my daughter was born in the UK. I am not married to the mother of my daughter. Is there a way I can apply for British citizenship? I was told to do a DNA test but I am not sure how helpful it would be to prove that I am the father of my daughter. If this is something that you can assist with, I would love to come to your office so you can research into this. Thank you very much for your assistance it is very much appreciated! Simon Khan.

It appears that you have illegally overstayed your general visitor visa. As a result, you are illegally in the UK. One of my colleagues will be contacting you shortly and it is suggested that you should make an appointment to see us as soon as possible. Otherwise, you may face a long-term ban of re-entering the UK once removed.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions

Dear Immigration Law Solutions. I was born in the UK and have lived here for my whole life. I am 21 years old. I do not have a passport and I wasn’t naturalized. I am now facing deportation. My father is from Angola, which is also my nationality. I have recently completed a 22 month sentence for drug related offense and have been fighting this case since 2015 where I was bailed by a friend but fell into crime again as I was not allowed to work or claim benefits for a very long time. I also have a letter from Angola High Commission that says they will not provide an ETD which renders me stateless. Can you help me or represent my case to revoke the order? I need help really badly.

Thank you for your message. In light of your situation, I have just asked one of my colleagues to be in touch with you shortly. As your situation is very serious, you will need to instruct us in order to represent you.

 

Please note that this response cannot be construed as legal advice until we have your full instructions. Rather, the answer provided is for information purposes only. If you would like to proceed to receiving full legal advice and representation with our immigration lawyers, please let us know what time is best for you for an appointment by contacting us on 0113 323 5766.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Immigration Law Solutions    

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